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MIT Develops Camera with 1 Trillion FPS

Posted on December 14, 2011
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You have heard of high-speed cameras, but MIT’s Media Lab has developed a camera that defies the speed limit. Their camera can capture images at 1 trillion frames per second! In fact, this camera is so fast, it can actually capture the movement of light particles.

As you can see in this image, it features a single photon of light traveling across a set of objects. This super high-speed camera consists of an array of 500 sensors, each triggered at a trillionth-of-a-second delay, which are housed in a rather large body. Despite its slow sensors, the camera can still manage to capture a fast movie.

In their trials, MIT uses a titanium-sapphire laser as the light source, which emits very short pulses. These pulses are then directed to a seam lined with mirrors. One major hindrance is that the camera can only see in one dimension. To fix that, another mirror rotates as the camera captures its subject so it can scan the whole field of view. All the images the camera took are then combined to create a single, ultra slow-motion movie.

Ramesh Raskar, associate professor at MIT Media Lab, explains that such a camera can be used in medical and industrial uses, and eventually for consumer photography. He adds:

“In medical imaging, we can now do ultrasound with light, because we can analyze how light will scatter one-dimensionally inside the body. In industrial imaging, one can use the scattered light to analyze defects in materials. And in consumer photography, we are always fascinated with creating lighting effects that appear to come from very sophisticated sources. But because we can watch photon seemingly through the space, we can analyze the transport, the movement of these photons, and create new photographs as if we have created those expensive light sources in a studio.”

Check out the video and be amazed as we do.

Source: Chime.in

 
 

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